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Maptalk-Digest Tuesday, December 22 1998 Volume 98 : Number 501

Re: Dennis Hastert
    From: Paul Wolf <>
Learning Channel Tonite!
    From: "Frank S. World" <>
Re: Re: Dennis Hastert
    From: "Larry & Mindy Stevens" <>
Re: MAP: riddled with = signs and various confusing numbers
    From: Stephen Carpenter <>
Re: MAP: riddled with = signs and various confusing numbers
    From: Richard Lake <>
1998's end marks 100 years of heroin
    From: Mike Gogulski <>
drugs: 'BIG BROTHER BANK' COMING TO A NEIGHBORHOOD NEAR Y...
    From: Mike Gogulski <>
ART: Heroin overdose suspected in death of Allen man, 18
    From: 


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subj: Re: Dennis Hastert
From: Paul Wolf <>
Date: Mon, 21 Dec 1998 18:47:57 -0500

We do not want Dennis Hastert to become the Speaker of 
the House.  It's worth the effort to oppose him - with 
our letter writing we can be a powerful force. 

------------------------------

Subj: Learning Channel Tonite!
From: "Frank S. World" <>
Date: Mon, 21 Dec 1998 18:57:58 -0600

Although it's too late for the Eastern & Central time zones, The Learning
Channel is running a 48 Hours episode with a segment on the San Francisco
Cannabis Buyers Club, from 1996.

48 Hours Guarding the Guards

After a riot that left one guard dead at the Southern Ohio Correctional
Facility, changes were made to improve safety. Also: the San Diego Zoo's
animal doctor; and A CLUB THAT SELLS MARIJUANA TO THE ILL. 

Air Time(s) Eastern Time:

TLC - 21 Dec 1998 - 07:00 PM

The segment airs about half way through the show.

Frank

------------------------------

Subj: Re: Re: Dennis Hastert
From: "Larry & Mindy Stevens" <>
Date: Mon, 21 Dec 1998 19:08:48 -0600

Bob Bennett was on the Rush Limbaugh show today (although Rush himself was
a no-show).  The former drug czar predicted that Dennis Hastert would
probably make the WOD his centerpiece.

I think a more perfect idiot or easier target than Dennis Hastert could not
be found to bring our issue front and center where it belongs.  

Although we may well fear for Liberty in the short term, we must remember
that House Republicans have acted irresponsibly in the eyes of most
Americans, and most people are scared and repulsed by Gingrich, DeLay,
Barr, McCullom et al.  It will soon be clear to all that Hastert is merely
a puppet for these guys.

Hastert only has two years of mischief-making at most before the voters
throw the Republicans out of power for the next several generations.  I
seriously doubt that Hastert will last very long at all, for the GOP could
explode at any moment.  

These guys will do more to discredit the WOD than we could ever hope to
imagine.  The GOP may need a phonics course to read the writing on the
wall, but I suspect many of the Dems are reading it quietly to themselves.

Here's to our newest posterboy!

- ----------
> From: Paul Wolf <>
> To: 
> Subject: MAP: Re: Dennis Hastert
> Date: Monday, December 21, 1998 5:47 PM
> 
> 
> We do not want Dennis Hastert to become the Speaker of 
> the House.  It's worth the effort to oppose him - with 
> our letter writing we can be a powerful force. 
> 
> 
> 
> 

------------------------------

Subj: Re: MAP: riddled with = signs and various confusing numbers
From: Stephen Carpenter <>
Date: Mon, 21 Dec 1998 20:39:33 -0500

On Mon, Dec 21, 1998 at 03:12:36PM -0800, Jim Rosenfield wrote:
> At 05:19 PM 12/21/98 EST, you wrote: 
> >>>>  
> 
> > Chris's original post came through riddled with  signs and various 
> > confusing numbers etc. Hopefully I corrected most of the  errors. 
> > 
> <<<< 
> 
> Has anyone come up with a definitive reason that these odd symbols come 
>  
> through on some folks postings? 
> 
> I only want responses from those that KNOW the answer, thanks. 

The answer has as much to do with your mail reader as their mail reader.

Many mail readers may use "Smart quotes" or other "High Ascii" charicters.
Unfortunatly these things are not universally supported. It basically
means that their reader is configured in such a way that it is sending
the mail in a format which your reader interprets differntly.

The simple answer is that ALL mail should use only 7 bit "low" ascii. 
(and no HTML either)

to say any more I would have needed to see samles of the original message.

- -Steve
- -- 
/* -- Stephen Carpenter <> --- <>------------ */
"Congress SHALL MAKE NO LAW respecting an establishment of religion, 
or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of
speach, or of the press; or the right of the people to peacefully 
assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances."
                -- The First Amendment of the Constitution of the USA

------------------------------

Subj: Re: MAP: riddled with = signs and various confusing numbers
From: Richard Lake <>
Date: Mon, 21 Dec 1998 22:09:07 -0500

At 08:39 PM 12/21/98 -0500, Stephen Carpenter wrote:
>On Mon, Dec 21, 1998 at 03:12:36PM -0800, Jim Rosenfield wrote:
>> At 05:19 PM 12/21/98 EST, you wrote: 
>> >>>>  
>> 
>> > Chris's original post came through riddled with  signs and various 
>> > confusing numbers etc. Hopefully I corrected most of the  errors. 
>> > 
>> <<<< 
>> 
>> Has anyone come up with a definitive reason that these odd symbols come 
>>  
>> through on some folks postings? 
>> 
>> I only want responses from those that KNOW the answer, thanks. 
>
>The answer has as much to do with your mail reader as their mail reader.
>
>Many mail readers may use "Smart quotes" or other "High Ascii" charicters.
>Unfortunatly these things are not universally supported. It basically
>means that their reader is configured in such a way that it is sending
>the mail in a format which your reader interprets differntly.
>
>The simple answer is that ALL mail should use only 7 bit "low" ascii. 
>(and no HTML either)
>

Friends,

We who post the news, the  , deal with this problem all
the time. Stephen is correct, but the problem is hard to explain. Perhaps
Matt or Mike will jump in here and do a better job than I.

My bottom line way of thinking of it is that the mail reader programs of
many, probably the majority of folks who receive our news emails worldwide,
are simply not set up to handle anything but "low" ascii code. The reasons
may be in either the email program or the font set the program uses,
depending on the software and operating system.

The message being discussed had code that was not low ascii code. Often
this causes  signs followed by a hex code number to appear. It also can
cause the ends of lines to have  signs at the end of all the message lines.

Many of us use Eudora as an email program to do the news work. Why? Because
it can be told not to send "quote printable" and styled text (this in
addition to it's superb filtering and a tool that makes headline work easy
by creating ALL CAPS or Word Caps lines out of other lines). This helps.

Smart quotes, the long em dash used in printing, the British Pound sign,
and many other characters which do not appear on the U.S. keyboard cause
problems. So our rule of thumb is that nothing we can not find on the U.S.
keyboard gets sent, even if it came to us OK and readable with our email
program. This is why you will see things like UKP1,250 instead of the pound
sign and the amount 1,250 in many news items.  We change it  when we see
the problem. Our good newshawk from western Ireland, Martin Cooke, knows
about the problem and fixes the pound signs for us.

This may not help anyone, but please look at the following:

http://www.bbsinc.com/iso8859.html

This is a table we use to help us figure out what the strange  plus
numbers actually mean. May as well be some foreign language for most of us.

I guess what I am trying to say is that the answer is not simple, and
involves problems not well understood by even a lot of folks who write
software code. It is well beyond something that can be explained well in an
email message, IMHO.  And, for sure, something that I can not explain very
well at all, but I know the problem when I see it.

Richard

------------------------------

Subj: 1998's end marks 100 years of heroin
From: Mike Gogulski <>
Date: Mon, 21 Dec 1998 23:07:47 -0500

>From: 
>Subject: drugs: 1898 SAW CASCADE OF SCIENTIFIC BREAKTHROUGHS
>To: 
>Subject: drugs: 1898 SAW CASCADE OF SCIENTIFIC BREAKTHROUGHS
>X-Inquisit-UserID: 25507021
>X-Inquisit-AgentID: 75191854
>X-Inquisit-AgentName: drugs
>Date: Mon, 21 Dec 1998 02:42:26 PST
>
>
>                  1898 SAW CASCADE OF SCIENTIFIC BREAKTHROUGHS
     
>                          (Columbus Dispatch; 12/20/98)
     
>
>   Charles Duell, director of the U.S. Patent Office, in 1898 earned his
place  
>in infamy by declaring, "Everything that can be invented, has been invented."
>
>   Duell may have felt overwhelmed.
>
>   The year 1898, after all, gave us radiation, Pepsi-Cola and **heroin**,
not 
>to  mention Grape-Nuts, Corn Flakes, tape recorders, rubber-cored golf
balls,  
>shortbread and Ping-Pong.
>
>   In any case, a century has passed since Duell closed the book, and it
seems  
>safe to say that discovery and invention continue.
>
>   Nevertheless, John Horgan, in his 1996 book, The End of Science,
advanced  
>the opinion of some scientists that most fundamental discoveries have been
made 
> and that science now has reached the point of diminishing returns.
>
>   Horgan was widely denounced, but we might want to keep an open mind
about  
>his thesis in view of the tendency of many scientists - and science
writers -  
>to overstate the importance of each discovery.
>
>   For example:
>
>   NASA scientists who, in 1996, claimed solid evidence of ancient Martian  
>microbes in an Antarctic meteorite are now in tactical retreat, claiming
their  
>hypothesis is "alive and kicking" while disavowing key findings.
>
>   "Some of the features in our press release photos and original paper may  
>have been artifacts or minerals resembling microbes," they said in a little- 
>noticed update published in November.
>
>   A front-page New York Times article in May inflated promising but still  
>untested research by Dr. Judah Folkman into the long-awaited cancer cure.
The  
>newspaper quoted Nobel laureate James Watson as saying, "Judah is going to
cure 
> cancer in two years," a quote Watson later disavowed.
>
>   Folkman himself never made such claims, and last week the journal
Science,  
>in its review, called the so-called breakthrough the year's "most
over-hyped  
>cancer cure."
>
>   Now, exciting science is taking place, and healthy skepticism shouldn't  
>spoil the fun.
>
>   Science, for example, says the big news this year was the resurrection
of  
>Einstein's cosmological constant, the idea that there exists some sort of
force 
> which opposes gravity and thus is speeding up the expansion of the universe.
>
>   "The finding raises such profound questions about the nature of space
that  
>cosmologists are wondering whether the ultimate fate of the universe can
ever  
>be known for certain," the journal said.
>
>   Science also is excited about advances in our understanding of circadian  
>rhythms and the potential to grow tissues for transplant from embryonic
stem  
>cells.
>
>   Still, the winds of change - as rapid as they may seem from our
perspective  
>at the eye of the storm - don't always measure up when compared with the  
>fundamental breakthroughs that rocked the scientific world a century ago.
>
>   According to the encyclopedia Timetables of Science, the 1890s were a  
>special time.
>
>   "Beginning just before the start of the 20th century, a series of
related  
>developments in physics - the discovery of X-rays, radioactivity, subatomic  
>particles, relativity and quantum theory - led to a profound revolution in
how  
>scientists view matter and energy," it reports.
>
>   In 1898, for example:
>
>   Marie and Pierre Curie discovered rays being emitted from uranium and
named  
>them radioactivity. By year's end, the Curies had revealed the existence
of a  
>new element called radium.
>
>   Following up, Ernest Rutherford defined two types of radioactivity,
alpha  
>and beta, and began the work that led to eventual discovery of the atom.
>
>   William Ramsay and Morris Travers discovered three new inert gases:
neon,  
>krypton and xenon.
>
>   English physician Ronald Ross pinpointed the parasite in mosquitos  
>responsible for the transmission of malaria in birds. Soon after, Italian  
>scientists demonstrated how the same cycle affects human beings.
>
>   Paul-Louis Simond recognized fleas on rats as the source of bubonic
plague  
>in India.
>
>   Botanist Martinus Willem Beijerinck identified the first virus, a
pathogen  
>that causes mosaic disease on tobacco plants.
>
>   It's hard to keep one's perspective in an age when cloning and the
search  
>for extraterrestrial life are no longer science fiction.
>
>   The study of history, however, remains a useful diuretic when we get too  
>full of ourselves.
>
>   David Lore, science reporter for The Dispatch, is online at dlore@ 
>dispatch.com
>
>(Copyright 1998)
>
>                    _____via IntellX_____
>
>{A5:ColumbusDispatch-1221.00165}   12/20/98
>
>
>
>
>>
>[ ] Put an X here to receive a form through which you may inspect,
>    modify, or stop this Agent. {drugs}
>
>
>
>Questions? Email  -- we're here to help!  Delivered
via the Inquisit(TM) business intelligence service
<http://www.inquisit.com>.  All articles Copyright 1998 by their respective
source(s); all rights reserved.  The information contained in this message
is for use by licensed Inquisit subscribers only and may not be forwarded,
distributed, published or broadcast in any medium.
>

------------------------------

Subj: drugs: 'BIG BROTHER BANK' COMING TO A NEIGHBORHOOD NEAR Y...
From: Mike Gogulski <>
Date: Mon, 21 Dec 1998 23:15:17 -0500

>From: 
>Subject: drugs: 'BIG BROTHER BANK' COMING TO A NEIGHBORHOOD NEAR Y...
>To: 
>Subject: drugs: 'BIG BROTHER BANK' COMING TO A NEIGHBORHOOD NEAR Y...
>X-Inquisit-UserID: 25507021
>X-Inquisit-AgentID: 75191854
>X-Inquisit-AgentName: drugs
>Date: Mon, 21 Dec 1998 12:03:23 PST
>
>
>    'BIG BROTHER BANK' COMING TO A NEIGHBORHOOD NEAR YOU, LIBERTARIANS
WARN     
>                            (PR Newswire; 12/21/98)
    
>
>LOS ANGELES, Dec. 21 /PRNewswire/ -- Banks will serve as the eyes and ears
of  
>the government if a recently published federal proposal is enacted, the  
>Libertarian Party of California warned today.
>
>Published in the December 7th Federal Register, the proposed regulations --  
>deceptively dubbed "Know Your Customer" -- would require private banks to  
>monitor their customers' transactions and report any "suspicious" activity
to  
>the federal government.
>
>"'Know Your Customer' is a euphemism for 'Watch, Monitor, and Suspect All  
>Customers,'" announced Libertarian state chair Mark Hinkle.  "The plan is a  
>stunning violation of personal privacy -- not to mention the Fourth
Amendment  
>guarantee against unreasonable search and seizure."
>
>In addition to the Constitutional and privacy issues, the Libertarian Party  
>finds the proposed regulations problematic because:
>
>    (1)  Banks already face a mountain of cumbersome reporting
>
>requirements. For example, banks are required to file Currency Transaction  
>Reports for any customer who makes a transaction of $10,000 or more.
"With the 
> additional burden of a 'Know Your Customer' program, banks would have to 
>expend  substantial, valuable time and resources on monitoring every single 
>transaction  that takes place," noted Hinkle.  "The government is drowning 
>private banks in  a sea of unconstitutional, unfair, and unnecessary 
>regulations."
>
>    (2)  The regulations add another element to the war on **drugs**.
>
>Regulators claim the plan is needed to "combat illicit activities." But as  
>author James Bovard wrote in a recent Investor's Business Daily editorial,  
>"These new regs are largely a result of the failure of money-laundering
laws to 
> curb the flow of **drugs**," and would create "broad new classes of
criminals 
>who  have nothing to do with **narcotics** trafficking."
>
>    (3)  Bank customers would be guilty until proven innocent.
>
>"Anyone who comes into a large sum of cash -- such as a widow receiving an  
>inheritance or an employee awarded a bonus -- would have to prove the  
>legitimacy of the source of funds or risk coming under suspicion,"
predicted  
>Hinkle.  "Such suspicion flies in the face of a free society."
>
>    The regulations were simultaneously proposed by the Federal
>
>Reserve System, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Treasury's  
>Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, and the Treasury's Office of
Thrift  
>Supervision.  All are accepting public comment on the regulations until
March  
>8, 1999.
>
>Banks and privacy groups are stepping forward to oppose the plan.  The  
>California Bankers Association has drafted an opposition letter, and the
ACLU,  
>the Free Congress Foundation, and the Electronic Privacy Information
Center are 
> mobilizing to fight the proposal.
>
>"Add the Libertarian Party of California to that list," declared Hinkle.  
>"Banking customers should be free to conduct business in private without  
>worrying that 'Big Brother' is watching.  We urge all Californians to
express  
>their outrage to the morally bankrupt regulators in Washington and send a
clear 
> message: 'Leave us alone.' Or better yet, voters should start a new program 
>for  bureaucrats: 'Know Your Constitution.'"  SOURCE  Libertarian Party of  
>California
>
>-0-                             12/21/98 /CONTACT:  Juan Ros of the
Libertarian 
> Party of California, 818-506-0200, fax, 818-506-0212, /
>
>/Web site:  http://www.ca.lp.org/  CO:  Libertarian Party of California
ST:   
>California IN:  FIN SU:
>
>{PRNewswire:WallStreet-1221.02323}   12/21/98
>
>
>
>
>>
>[ ] Put an X here to receive a form through which you may inspect,
>    modify, or stop this Agent. {drugs}
>
>
>
>Questions? Email  -- we're here to help!  Delivered
via the Inquisit(TM) business intelligence service
<http://www.inquisit.com>.  All articles Copyright 1998 by their respective
source(s); all rights reserved.  The information contained in this message
is for use by licensed Inquisit subscribers only and may not be forwarded,
distributed, published or broadcast in any medium.
>

------------------------------

Subj: ART: Heroin overdose suspected in death of Allen man, 18
From: 
Date: Tue, 22 Dec 1998 09:25:54 -0600 (CST)

From the 12-22-98 Dallas Morning News
http://www.dallasnews.com


- ------------------------------------
Heroin overdose suspected in death of Allen man, 18

Heroin overdose is suspected in the death of an 18-year-old Allen man
whose friends dropped him off at Presbyterian Hospital late Saturday,
Dallas policy said.  Joshua Austin Harman, who had gone into cardiac
arrest when his friends left him at the hospital, died at 9:18 p.m.,
according to a police report. Police said that they thought Mr. Harman
and some friends had been using drugs at a northeast Dallas apartment
when he passed out. Police said an autopsy would determine whether
heroin had caused his death. At least 15 Dallas-area people have died
from heroin overdoses in the last year. All but two of them were younger
than 25.

------------------------------

End of Maptalk-Digest V98 #501
******************************

Mark Greer ()         ___ ___     _ _  _ _
Media Awareness Project              /' _ ` _ `\ /'_`)('_`\
P. O. Box 651                        | ( ) ( ) |( (_| || (_) )
Porterville, CA 93258                (_) (_) (_) \__,_)| ,__/
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URL: http://www.mapinc.org/lists/                      (_)

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