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Maptalk-Digest Wednesday, December 11 2002 Volume 02 : Number 453

001 Gore and Phish?
    From: M & M Family <>
002 protesting the media
    From: "kim hanna" <>
003 web filters
    From: "J-White" <>
004 Re: MAP: web filters
    From: Bar n Grill <>
005 UK government approves heroin use on prescription
    From: "kim hanna" <>
006 Drug Addiction, Diabetes...What's the Difference?
    From: Bar n Grill <>


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subj: 001 Gore and Phish?
From: M & M Family <>
Date: Mon, 9 Dec 2002 21:55:13 -0800

Hard to believe, but Al Gore is going to be the host on Saturday 
Night Live this coming Saturday with musical guest, Phish!  Want to 
take bets on the number of pot jokes there will be?  Might this 
appearance be the first public unveiling of the "new Al Gore" and 
what will he allude to in terms of his support for marijuana reform? 
Set your VCRs!!

------------------------------

Subj: 002 protesting the media
From: "kim hanna" <>
Date: Tue, 10 Dec 2002 07:38:41 -0500

We at MAP protest the media by writing LTE's but when people do Vigils and 
street protests the local media outlets may be a good point to launch 
protest; to demand accurate reporting of the WOD's.
===========

BREAKING NEWS

Dear Colleagues,

Alex Main reports from Caracas that masses of Venezuelans have
peacefully
surrounded all the commercial TV stations in the country to
protest the
dishonest simulating efforts by these media giants to provoke a
coup d'etat:

http://www.narconews.com/



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http://clinic.mcafee.com/clinic/ibuy/campaign.asp?cid=3963

------------------------------

Subj: 003 web filters
From: "J-White" <>
Date: Tue, 10 Dec 2002 18:07:26 -0500

This isn't really MAP material but it is probably of interest to many.

Web filters block some health sites, study says
Tuesday December 10, 5:42 pm ET
By Andy Sullivan

WASHINGTON, Dec 10 (Reuters) - Teens searching the Internet for information
about birth control, drug abuse and other health topics may often be stymied
by government-mandated filters in schools and libraries, according to a
study released on Tuesday.

Filters that screen out pornography and other objectionable material rarely
block Web sites containing information about alcohol abuse, breast cancer,
depression or sexually transmitted diseases, the nonprofit Kaiser Family
Foundation reported.

But at more restrictive screening levels used by many schools, the filters
were much more likely to block information about homosexuality, condoms, and
safe-sex practices, the study found. At the most restrictive settings, more
than half of all Web sites on such topics -- including government sites --
were blocked.

Content filters made by companies such as N2H2 Inc (OTC BB:NTWO.OB - News)
and Websense Inc (NasdaqNM:WBSN - News) allow parents, librarians or school
authorities to block Web browsers from viewing objectionable content. Users
can choose to block only pornography, or can screen out other categories
such as nudity, violence, dating and swimsuits.

An N2H2 spokesman said the report was proof that filters worked as
advertised, and report author Caroline Richardson agreed that when set only
to block pornography, filters could easily differentiate between pornography
and health sites.

But they were less discriminating when set to screen out other categories,
she said.

Some saw this as a troubling sign for teens who turn to the Internet to find
out about topics they may not be comfortable discussing in public.

"This means that the teenage girl who goes online looking for information
about emergency contraception might not get it in time to prevent a
pregnancy," said Michael McGhee, vice president of education for Planned Par
enthood of America.

Congress required all schools and libraries that receive federal technology
funds to filter their Internet connections two years ago, but a federal
court struck down the portion of the law that applied to libraries this
spring. The Supreme Court is scheduled to hear the case next year.

The report won praise for its thoroughness -- it tested eight different
filtering services against more than 3,500 Web sites -- but seemed unlikely
to resolve a debate about the controversial filters that has raged for
years.

Anti-porn activist Donna Rice Hughes said filters were necessary to keep
children from the explicit sexual material so easily available online.

"You can't tell young kids thatgurls.com is a great site for kids, but
girls.com is a porn site," Hughes said. With filters, "a parent can tailor a
tool for a 7-year-old."

Emily Sheketoff of the American Library Association said that the filters
only blocked nine out of 10 pornography sites, according to the report.

"That's a worse effectiveness rate than most condoms," she said.

------------------------------

Subj: 004 Re: MAP: web filters
From: Bar n Grill <>
Date: Tue, 10 Dec 2002 15:15:39 -0800 (PST)

Web filters are such a joke to anyone with cyber
experience.

I understand that during the past couple of years, the
porno sites are just changing the
language...literally.

They alter key words so that filters aren't triggered.

Breasts or Boobs = B00bs
Tits = Titts

We may have to do the same some day with DPR related
language if the Hatchs and Feinsteins ever get their
way....

Pot = Medicine

is one that currently works and it's pissing off drug
warriors everywhere...heh

Steve in Clearwater
- --- J-White <> wrote:
> This isn't really MAP material but it is probably of
> interest to many.
> 
> Web filters block some health sites, study says
> Tuesday December 10, 5:42 pm ET
> By Andy Sullivan
> 
> WASHINGTON, Dec 10 (Reuters) - Teens searching the
> Internet for information
> about birth control, drug abuse and other health
> topics may often be stymied
> by government-mandated filters in schools and
> libraries, according to a
> study released on Tuesday.
> 
> Filters that screen out pornography and other
> objectionable material rarely
> block Web sites containing information about alcohol
> abuse, breast cancer,
> depression or sexually transmitted diseases, the
> nonprofit Kaiser Family
> Foundation reported.
> 
> But at more restrictive screening levels used by
> many schools, the filters
> were much more likely to block information about
> homosexuality, condoms, and
> safe-sex practices, the study found. At the most
> restrictive settings, more
> than half of all Web sites on such topics --
> including government sites --
> were blocked.
> 
> Content filters made by companies such as N2H2 Inc
> (OTC BB:NTWO.OB - News)
> and Websense Inc (NasdaqNM:WBSN - News) allow
> parents, librarians or school
> authorities to block Web browsers from viewing
> objectionable content. Users
> can choose to block only pornography, or can screen
> out other categories
> such as nudity, violence, dating and swimsuits.
> 
> An N2H2 spokesman said the report was proof that
> filters worked as
> advertised, and report author Caroline Richardson
> agreed that when set only
> to block pornography, filters could easily
> differentiate between pornography
> and health sites.
> 
> But they were less discriminating when set to screen
> out other categories,
> she said.
> 
> Some saw this as a troubling sign for teens who turn
> to the Internet to find
> out about topics they may not be comfortable
> discussing in public.
> 
> "This means that the teenage girl who goes online
> looking for information
> about emergency contraception might not get it in
> time to prevent a
> pregnancy," said Michael McGhee, vice president of
> education for Planned Par
> enthood of America.
> 
> Congress required all schools and libraries that
> receive federal technology
> funds to filter their Internet connections two years
> ago, but a federal
> court struck down the portion of the law that
> applied to libraries this
> spring. The Supreme Court is scheduled to hear the
> case next year.
> 
> The report won praise for its thoroughness -- it
> tested eight different
> filtering services against more than 3,500 Web sites
> -- but seemed unlikely
> to resolve a debate about the controversial filters
> that has raged for
> years.
> 
> Anti-porn activist Donna Rice Hughes said filters
> were necessary to keep
> children from the explicit sexual material so easily
> available online.
> 
> "You can't tell young kids thatgurls.com is a great
> site for kids, but
>girls.com is a porn site," Hughes said. With
> filters, "a parent can tailor a
> tool for a 7-year-old."
> 
> Emily Sheketoff of the American Library Association
> said that the filters
> only blocked nine out of 10 pornography sites,
> according to the report.
> 
> "That's a worse effectiveness rate than most
> condoms," she said.
> 

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------------------------------

Subj: 005 UK government approves heroin use on prescription
From: "kim hanna" <>
Date: Tue, 10 Dec 2002 18:23:52 -0500

Newshawk: Kim Hanna
Source: The British Medical Journal
Published: December 7, 2002
Author: Lynn Eaton

BMJ 2002;325:1321 ( 7 December )
News roundup

UK government approves heroin use on prescription

Lynn Eaton London

Heroin users should, in certain circumstances, be able to get the drug on 
prescription from their GP, a Home Office strategy on tackling drug misuse 
has recommended.

The move recognises that not all users find that methadone, the commonly 
prescribed substitute, works. For some users, it may be better, initially at 
least, to prescribe heroin, but then gradually move on to methadone.

The announcement came as part of a major government initiative to tackle the 
problem of illegal drugs use in the United Kingdom.

Heroin prescribing was welcomed by the drugs charity Turning Point. Richard 
Kramer, head of policy, said it might reduce the risk of overdose and could 
suit entrenched users.

"But it is just one approach," he said. "What we are pleased about is they 
have got a new focus on harm reduction and working with GPs in reducing the 
risks with drug abuse."

But he said GPs needed incentives to get involved in such work: "It is not 
enough to rely on the good will of GPs. Real training is needed."

The government's latest strategy includes a substantial cash injection for 
treatment services and an advertising campaign about the dangers of drug 
misuse, due to start in spring 2003, targeting young people.

The home secretary, David Blunkett, has also announced that the total spend 
on initiatives to tackle drug misuse will rise to nearly £1.5bn ($2.3bn; 
?2.3bn) in 2005-6, an increase of nearly £500m.

A third of the spending by 2005-6 (£573m) will be on treatment services, 
including treatment in prisons. Current spending on treatment services is 
£438m—slightly under half the current total budget of just over £1bn.

Mr Blunkett said the government would build on the work of the National 
Treatment Agency, set up by the health secretary last year, to improve the 
provision of drug treatment.

"All controlled drugs are harmful and will remain illegal," he said. "The 
misery caused by the use of drugs and hard drugs that kill cannot be 
underestimated. It damages the health and life chances of individuals; it 
undermines family life, tears apart communities, and turns law abiding 
citizens into thieves.

" The government intends to focus on class A drugs in future. Drug addicted 
offenders will be offered the opportunity of treatment in a residential 
centre rather than custody when they have their bail hearing.

The latest strategy includes:

· Targeting areas known for high rates of drug misuse

· Expanding treatment services to meet individual need and include more 
residential treatment

· Improving treatment for crack and cocaine users

· Improving access to GP services

· Providing aftercare for people leaving prison to stop them returning to 
illegal drug use

· Providing support for families and carers.

The Department of Health has set up an advisory group to look at the most 
effective treatment for heroin users.

Updated Drug Strategy 2002 is available at www.drugs.gov.uk/NationalStrategy

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------------------------------

Subj: 006 Drug Addiction, Diabetes...What's the Difference?
From: Bar n Grill <>
Date: Wed, 11 Dec 2002 13:26:50 -0800 (PST)

A quote from some of the Canadian coverage reminded me
again of how close the two topics, drug policy reform
and public health care are.

From various reports up north: "....said Focus on the
Family Canada spokesperson Anna Marie White.  "The
absurdity of giving needles and narcotics to injection
drug users becomes apparent when we consider that
diabetic must pay for their life-saving needles and
insulin." 

It really brings home a more fundamental and
underlying question to both topics above.

Who will control the drug supplies in our country and
who will qualify to have easy or difficult access to
same?

IMHO, a more compassionate society would not only
provide safe injection sites for heroin addicts, but
likewise would provide all the insulin and needles
required by our millions of diabetics.

Why should a person with diabetes be enslaved by the
profit-driven pharmacuetical companies?

For that matter of course, we could include other
essential meds like blood pressure drugs, cholestorol
reduction drugs, etc.

It's a shit society that demands we 'earn' our good
health, most especially when that health is tied to
conditions that are out of our voluntary control,
which diabetes most often is.

end of rant from Clearwater

Steve

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------------------------------

End of Maptalk-Digest V02 #453
******************************

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