Back to Map

MAPTalk-Digest Friday, December 19 2003 Volume 03 : Number 282

001 Steve Kubby denied political asylum in Canada
    From: Tim Meehan <>
002 Send your friends ONDCP propaganda e-cards!
    From: Tim Meehan <>
003 Emery Live: TONIGHT at 10 E / 7 P atpot-tv.net
    From: Tim Meehan <>
004 5th Annual SSDP National Conference
    From: "Tom Angell" <>
005 Re: tech help needed
    From: Richard Lake <>
006 Re: MAP: January is Snitch Month
    From: "Elmer Elevator" <>
007 RE: MAP: January is Snitch Month
    From: "Jim White" <>


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subj: 001 Steve Kubby denied political asylum in Canada
From: Tim Meehan <>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 16:24:31 -0500

http://www.lp.org/lpnews/0402/kubby_asylum.html

Steve Kubby denied political asylum in Canada

Medical marijuana refugee and former California LP gubernatorial candidate Steve
Kubby has been denied political asylum in Canada.

Kubby, who takes marijuana on doctor's orders to treat a rare form of adrenal
cancer, had requested asylum because he said he would face a death sentence if
he was returned to the United States and denied access to the drug.

However, in a December 8 ruling, the Canadian Immigration and Refugee Board
ruled that Kubby did not have reasonable grounds to "fear cruel and unusual
punishment" in the United States.

Kubby, who may have to leave Canada within 30 days, said the decision was
motivated by prejudice against medical marijuana.

"We were just stunned when we saw the decision because it was just completely
contrary to the testimony and the science and the evidence that we introduced,"
he told the Associated Press. "We really think this decision is not only
erroneous, but a bigoted decision.

"These people seem determined to want to put me in a prison cell to see if I'm
really telling the truth -- that I have life and death medical necessity for
medical cannabis."

Kubby, 57, who currently lives in Sechelt, British Columbia with his wife
Michele and their two daughters, said he will appeal the decision to the Federal
Court of Canada.

If he is extradited to the USA, Kubby said he will be denied access to the
medical marijuana that has kept him alive for the past 35 years.

"If I go back to the United States, I'm facing an immediate bailiff's warrant,"
he told the Associated Press. "They'll put me in jail. They're not going to give
me marijuana. I am really between a rock and a hard place."

Kubby had been diagnosed with a form of adrenal cancer in 1968, and was given
just a few years to live.

He has defied the odds since then. He had surgery to remove a tumor, got
chemotherapy and radiation treatment, and began smoking medical marijuana to
suppress the cancer.

Before fleeing to Canada, Kubby was a resident of California, where he used
medical marijuana legally under the state's Proposition 215.

Passed by voters in 1996, the initiative legalized the use of medical marijuana
under a doctor's supervision.

In 1998, Kubby ran for governor of California on the Libertarian Party ticket in
a campaign that focused on overturning the state government's foot-dragging on
Proposition 215.

In 1999, police raided Kubby's home in Olympia Valley and found marijuana
plants. Kubby used Proposition 215 as a defense, saying he grew and used the
drug for medicinal purposes.

A deadlocked jury acquitted Kubby and Michele of possession of marijuana with
intent to sell. However, Kubby was convicted of possession of trace amounts of
peyote (mescaline).

The felony conviction was reduced to a misdemeanor, and Kubby was sentenced to
120 days in jail. He fled to Canada in 2001, saying jail time without access to
medical marijuana was tantamount to a death sentence.

In August 2002, Kubby was granted permission by Health Canada to grow and smoke
marijuana for medical reasons.

Under Canadian law, people can use marijuana for medical purposes. The Canadian
government even supplies marijuana to people with AIDS, cancer, and multiple
sclerosis.

In April 2003, Kubby formally requested political asylum in Canada, arguing that
he would be jailed if he returned to the USA. Since he would be denied access to
medical marijuana, such a jail sentence would constitute "cruel and unusual
punishment" and torture, he argued.

At his hearing before the Canadian Immigration and Refugee Board, Dr. Joseph
Connors of the British Columbia Cancer Agency testified that Kubby would die
within four days if he did not have access to medical marijuana.

Conners said Kubby could suffer a fatal heart attack or stroke without the drug.

However, in its December 8 ruling, the Immigration and Refugee Board rejected
that argument, stating: "What Mr. Kubby alleges does not amount to persecution.
There are no substantial grounds to believe that his removal to the United
States will subject him personally to a danger of torture."

The Board agreed that marijuana apparently helped Kubby cope with cancer, but
said there was no definitive evidence that it kept him alive. The Board also
said it believed Kubby would receive medical marijuana in jail.

Kubby said he would appeal the decision so he could "get this before a real
court and a real judge." An appeal could take up to three years, and Kubby would
not be deported until the appeals process has run its course.

According to news reports, there are more than 100 so-called "reefer refugees"
in Canada, who fled the USA to escape prosecution for using medical marijuana.

------------------------------

Subj: 002 Send your friends ONDCP propaganda e-cards!
From: Tim Meehan <>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 20:40:25 -0500

http://www.freevibe.com/stonercard/stonercard_fl.html

------------------------------

Subj: 003 Emery Live: TONIGHT at 10 E / 7 P atpot-tv.net
From: Tim Meehan <>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 21:31:56 -0500

Marc Emery Live with Hillary Black, & Dana Larsen,

AS HIGH AS YOU CAN GET LIVE ON THE NET! 

Starts at 7pm PST. In this live Broadcast Marc Emery talks to Hillary Black of
the Vancouver Compassion Club and editor of Cannabis Culture Magazine Dana
Larsen. With marijuana man and the Tall Brothers Reefer Band. 

Phone in your questions and comments (604)682-0039

------------------------------

Subj: 004 5th Annual SSDP National Conference
From: "Tom Angell" <>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 21:43:00 -0500

This year's SSDP conference is sure to be the most exciting one yet!

Tom Angell
SSDP Board of Directors
www.ssdp.org 

The 5th Annual SSDP National Conference at the College Convention in
Manchester, NH, January 7-10, 2004 (www.ssdp.org) is going to be off the
hook!  If you haven't committed to go, then read on.  By the end of this
e-mail your fanny-pack will be strapped and you will be asking Santa for
warm gloves and hats!    

Don't let the man get you down.  If you want to go, then I WILL GET YOU
THERE.  Call me!  202.293.4414

TOP 10 REASONS TO GO TO NEW HAMPSHIRE

10.	Generation E debut:  Written, produced, and edited by
24-year-old film student and harm reduction activist Le Sheng Liu. This
feature-length video documents the passage of a new federal law called
the Illicit Drug Anti-Proliferation Act, better known as the R.A.V.E.
Act.

9.	Special performance by Climbing PoeTree:  Alixa and Naima's
spoken-word, multi-media and slide show performance about the War on
Drug's racialization of mass incarceration and US-backed Plan Colombia.
http://gotpoetry.com/artforachange/

8.	Hot Tubs in the hotel

7.	Hear Drug Policy Alliance president and powerhouse ETHAN
NADELMANN speak at the SSDP kick-off reception
www.drugpolicy.org 

6.	Fundraise for SSDP and network with movement leaders: Run for
the Board of Directors at the National Congress
http://www.ssdp.org/SSDP_ROOT/8_About_SSDP/leaders.htm
	
5.	Dress up like your favorite College Republican

4.	Meet the man that gives you your purpose:  WIlliam Bennet,
Reagan's Drug Czar
		http://www.mediatransparency.org/people/wbennett.htm

3.	Free peanut butter and jelly bar every night at the Holiday Inn
Express and Suites hotel (YUM!)
1298 South Porter Street Manchester, NH 03103 Ph: 603-669-6800
$89/night.  Be sure to say you are with SSDP for discounted rate.

2.	Limited scholarships available.  Call me! 202-293-4414, and I
will get you to the SSDP Conference.  
		
			Drumrolll....
	
1.	Be part of the first successful effort in 33 years to repeal a
federal drug law that denies students access to financial aid for drug
convictions (www.raiseyourvoice.com). This is our responsibility, folks.
The time is right, and the time is now.  Best part of it all?  We get to
do it on national media, in front of our friends, family, and college
professors.

Register at www.ssdp.org and use your credit card to pay for
registration.  If you are serious about Drug Policy but seriously broke,
then call me.  I'll get you there.  

Abby Bair
National Outreach Coordinator
Students for Sensible Drug Policy
1623 Connecticut Ave NW Suite 300
Washington, D.C. 20009
Ph:	202.293.4414
Fax:	202.293.8344

------------------------------

Subj: 005 Re: tech help needed
From: Richard Lake <>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2003 00:58:34 -0500

Hi, Herb

First I am using the latest version of each of these browsers for windoze, 
so if you are using earlier versions, the results may not be exactly the 
same. The problem in either case is one of taking the article out of a page 
with frames and into one without - so that the actual URL shows up in your 
browser's address or URL window at the top of the screen where you can copy it.

For MSIE:

When I went to http://www.surreyleader.com/ I found the article you were 
working with "Police bust 38 grow ops" towards the bottom of the page.

When I right clicked on the words "Police bust 38 grow ops" the dropdown 
gave me the option "Open in New Window". Selecting that option opened the 
article in a new window with the URL available.

For Netscape:

Once I went to the actual article I could right click anywhere on the text, 
and the dropdown gave me a line "This Frame" which by opening I got the 
choice "Show Only  This Frame."  Using the choice opened a new window with 
actual article URL at the top.

Using the URL:

The Editors at MAP always appreciate it when newshawks supply the URL to 
the actual article. Sometimes our roboeditor software messes up the 
article, so editors wish to go to it directly to obtain the fix. And Yes, 
having the URL is critical for items from those newspaper chains that have 
asked us not to display the full article in our archives.

It makes the work of the editors faster when the URL  is supplied after the 
lead line, Webpage: as our roboeditor software then automatically places it 
in the proper field for the source, as needed. Thus, it is appreciated that 
for this article if the URL was placed in a line like this:

Webpage: 
http://www.surreyleader.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=73&cat=23&id=1

Note, however, that it is also helpful when long URL's can be cut back to 
the point where they still work - because when some folks get copies via 
email of the article with the long URL it may wrap and break, and not work.

In this case, for example, the "&more=" is not needed to go to the page, so 
the URL can be cut back thus:

Webpage: 
http://www.surreyleader.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=73&cat=23&id=1

and it still works. Not much of a savings, but I have found Webpage URLs 
that could be reduced by as much as half their characters.

After using MSIE versions for the last few years, I am now using Netscape.

I spend a lot of hours on line and when this older machine using windoze 
'98 runs for a long time, six or eight hours or so, moving thru MSIE 
webpages seems to cause memory leaks, and an eventual crash - of course at 
a time when something gets lost. Thus I switched primarily to using 
Netscape a couple months ago, and actual crash problems have been 
substantially reduced (though I still try to reboot at least once a day, 
and try not to keep unneeded programs open).

Netscape is a larger program, takes longer to load, but the tradeoff I now 
think is worth it. Besides, I had used Netscape from time to time to copy 
articles from pages where it was more difficult to do so in MSIE. So even 
though I have both browsers I now switch less often, and then mostly to see 
if a page looks good in MSIE also - rather than switching for newshawking 
purposes.

Oh, I wouldn't call myself a tech - at least not like Matt Elrod. I have 
not a clue about webpage creating, HTML, MySQL databases, the huge 
advantages of not using a MS windoze web server, etc.

Thanks so much for all your newshawking, Herb!

Richard

p.s.  Oh, Herb, since it sounds like you are new to the wonderful world of 
windoze, here is a couple of programs I find of superb value for both 
newshawking and editing:

ClipMate, from http://www.thornsoft.com/ is one of the very few programs I 
have actually bought and paid for that did not come with my computer. It is 
a multi-clip clipboard, which is always running and available for me. I 
have a variety of collections of clips that I use for different purposes. 
Plus very often when I see text that does not look like it is formatted 
right, I can correct the problem by using the neat No Paragraph button in 
ClipMate, which removes paragraph marks from the ends of lines internal to 
paragraphs, while leaving alone text where there is two paragraph marks at 
the end of a paragraph (as long as that is what is creating the blank line 
between paragraphs). You can try before you buy, if you wish. I bought it 
on line.

Eudora for windoze for me is a must. I need a real industrial strength 
email program, since I receive four or five hundred emails a day. I use the 
latest version from http://www.eudora.com/ in the "ad" mode which puts a 
small ad I can float where I want on the Eudora window, because I am a poor 
retired guy, and cheap, and I hardly notice the ad - and there is very 
little difference between the ad version and the paid version.

Personally, I will not even allow mickeysoft's email programs to exist on 
my hard drive as it seems that just about every virus sent by email is 
designed to use their software to do the dirty stuff.

But additionally, I use The MAP UprLwr32.DLL  - a replacement for the plug 
in file of the same name that is standard on windoze Eudora installations. 
It contains all of the translators, unchanged, of that DLL plus several 
additional ones.

One additional tool, called Fix, fixes a huge number of problems with text 
that we receive as editors, like turning "smart quotes" into standard 
keyboard quotes - and fixing a whole bunch of other problems with text as 
it appears on many newspaper websites.

Other tools in the MAP Eudora plug in help with headlining and subject 
lines, allowing the quick creation of our subject line headlines - and ones 
that understand that DEA, ONDCP, and a whole bunch of other similar 
abbreviations should remain in CAPS when creating the subject line headline.

If any Eudora users want to get the MAP plug in, you need to message editor 
Terry Liittschwager at 
He wrote it, and sends out updates as needed. It comes with instructions 
that even a big dummy like me could follow to get it installed and working 
in windoze Eudora.

Oh, I do my best to try to respond to questions that will help make the 
work of newshawks and editors easier, so please, feel free! If I don't 
know, I try to get the question to someone who does.

But sometimes I am not always quick in responding as I do get very busy at 
times - or even a little behind (like I am now, recovering from a nice 
night in the hotel of a local casino, a gift, a room with a Jacuzzi thing 
tub - which - along with it being a smoking room *smile* - was great, but I 
am just not used to sleeping in a strange room anymore so I really only got 
an hour of sleep, and am still recovering from that - another old coot 
problem, I guess.)

At 09:33 PM 12/18/03, Herb wrote
>CMAPers & hawktalkers,
>
>How can one copy and paste the URL at sites like:
>
>http://www.surreyleader.com/
>
>Normally, if I go anywhere at this site the URL stays the same. i.e. 
>http://www.surreyleader.com/
>
>However, if I go to View and check Status Bar and then hold the cursor 
>over a news title like "Police bust 38 grow ops" the entire
>URL
>is shown down below in the Status Bar.
>
>But, I don't know how to highlight and copy the full URL in the status bar.
>
>Can anyone help?
>
>Right now, I'm using Outlook Express and Internet Explorer. I'm used to 
>Eudora &  Mac land and I'm not that familiar with Windows
>yet.
>
>Thanks,
>
>Herb

------------------------------

Subj: 006 Re: MAP: January is Snitch Month
From: "Elmer Elevator" <>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2003 08:21:15 -0800

[sorry if this is a re-send]

The Soviet-bloc regimes in Eastern Europe were snitch-driven. I got to hang in one of them -- one of the kinder, gentler, warmer and fuzzier ones -- before the "Velvet Revolution" that finally toppled it and about eight other neighboring Socialist regimes.

While these regimes were running full-steam, they actually didn't control things with vast numbers of armed police and soldiers. That was more like an optical illusion or a magician's trick. Of course they had armed police and weren't shy about using them when there was some kind of "counter-revolutionary" trouble in the city square or at the university.

But most of what kept everybody well-behaved were the Snitches. Every apartment building had one or two. Every block. Every office, every factory, every school.

If jazz or rock n roll or short-wave radio from the West was leaking out of your apartment, a snitch reported it. They sniffed through your mail for foreign mail and anything slightly suspicious. And of course they eavesdropped on all your casual conversations, and reported any sentiments which weren't in full harmony with the Party Program.

In return, the Snitches got priority for the material cream the economically stretched, stressed and strained country had to pass around: The best schools for your kids, reserved for the Party Faithful. More liberal travelling. A better car, a bigger apartment.

And, of course, like Crime Stoppers, straight cash on the barrelhood for Juicy Tips, no questions asked, plenty more where that came from.

If you can't envision life without some minimal guaranteed volume of privacy for thought, imagination, musical taste, political expression, welcome to your Kafka nightmare. For the most idealistic and Utopian of reasons, the state just stripped you totally naked of any and all right to expression or privacy or individuality or daydreaming. Klaus or Senta two doors down the hall would drop a dime on you. Your neighbors knew the local Crime Stoppers number.

With civic-minded ever-vigilant neighbors like that, who needs lots of cops?

Well, all good things must come to an end, and around 1990 all these regimes just collapsed like a house of cards. It is not true that these regimes fell without a single shot being fired. Not a single shot was fired by the protesters. The regimes, on the other hand, didn't like the short-term future they were seeing, and shot lots of people to try to stay in power. In those last weeks, mere prison wasn't good enough.

It is important to realize that, after 45 or 75 years of Government By Bully, Gun, Jail and Snitch (I don't know if the Greeks had a word for that one), eventually bullies, guns, jails and snitches weren't enough to keep most people well-behaved, or locked within borders, or under control, or ignorant, or obedient.

The government made it quite clear: If you challenge us, we will shoot you.

It wasn't enough. They're all gone now.

These are rare historical moments of close inspection for big snitch machines like Crime Stoppers. Ordinarily, while the snitch machine is running on all twelve cylinders, nobody gets to peek inside the machine, to see its paperwork and memos and directives and mugshots and lists of snitches and who they snitched on and over what and when, and what happened to those who got snitched on.

But after the Velvet Revolutions, you bet the New Guys wanted to look inside those file cabinets that the Ministry of Snitches had been filling with paper for forty years. And they kept great records, because they knew (incorrectly) that no one would ever get to see them.

Such sadness. Such misery. Such a terrible mirror to hold up to ourselves as a race and a community. Such a terrible reflection, if not of ourselves, of our aunts, our cousins, or co-workers, the postal person, the waitress, other people in the park.

Most people soon discovered how simple and profitable it was to use the snitch machine to settle old grudges and spites.

Another guy beat you out in high school for Annika's affections? Make up the right story, send him to jail for three months, get him completely bounced to the bottom of the labor and economic food chain for the rest of his life -- and get $50 to boot!

Pissed off at that shapely little young tramp upstairs? Couldn't get satisfaction from the guy who repaired your car so badly? Did that teacher insult your kid?

And the always-popular grudge against your ex-spouse. A built-in state-designed way to suddenly get the upper hand in those lingering disputes.

Drop a dime to Crime Stoppers.

People were just settling old scores by the tens of thousands.

Maybe, in the few countries that have a snitch machine AND a freedom of
information law, some journalist might get Real Lucky and get a substantive look (with a lot of redactions, you betchum) at the nuts and bolts and dirty laundry and moldy old clam dip of Crime Stoppers.

Who's using it to settle a score with Roger around the corner? Who's getting bumped up a chair in the civic orchestra since Rita got into all that trouble over pot?

We're not going to like what we see in the Crime Stoppers files in Winnipeg or Pittsburgh. But that's how all this shit works. Most psychiatrically healthy people don't give a rat's buttock who's smoking or snorting what. But there are always amongst us the Marginal, the Bitter, the Small, the Venal, the Cowardly.

And you can run a government with lots of them, for decades. Eastern Europe has just shown us the most ghastly face of that.

Elmer

==============

>-----Original Message-----
>From:  <>
>To: Tim Meehan <>;  < <>; >;  < <>; >;  <>
>Date: Tuesday, December 16, 2003 12:43 PM
>Subject: Re: MAP: January is Snitch Month

Please turn in Anne McCellan for harm done to the people of Canada.
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Tim Meehan <>
>Sent: Dec 16, 2003 10:40 AM
>To: , , , , 
>Subject: MAP: January is Snitch Month
>
>http://www.torontopolice.on.ca/newsreleases/release.php?id=4823
>
>Toronto Police Service
>
>NEWS RELEASE
>40 College Street,
>Toronto, Ontario
>M5G 2J3
>
>Unit/Telephone
>Corporate Communications
>416-808-7100
>
>We are dedicated to delivering police services, in partnership with our
>community,to keep the City of Toronto the best and safest place to be.
>
>Visit our Web site at http://www.TorontoPolice.on.ca/
>
>For Broadcast: 01:27 pm Date: 2003-12-15
>
>JANUARY IS CRIME STOPPERS MONTH
>
>

- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Attachment: http://www.mapinc.org/temp/part8127.html

------------------------------

Subj: 007 RE: MAP: January is Snitch Month
From: "Jim White" <>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2003 11:42:10 -0500

Elmer,

If you don't send this out as an editorial piece to every paper you can.

I'm gonna send the Vinny and the boys over there for a little Eastern bloc
partying.

(OK I'm kidding about the Eastern Block party, but this is a masterpiece!)

Peace.
Jim White

> -----Original Message-----
> From:  
> [] On Behalf Of Elmer Elevator
> Sent: Friday, December 19, 2003 11:21 AM
> To: ; 
> Subject: Re: MAP: January is Snitch Month
> 
> 
> [sorry if this is a re-send]
> 
> The Soviet-bloc regimes in Eastern Europe were snitch-driven. 
> I got to hang in one of them -- one of the kinder, gentler, 
> warmer and fuzzier ones -- before the "Velvet Revolution" 
> that finally toppled it and about eight other neighboring 
> Socialist regimes.
> 
> While these regimes were running full-steam, they actually 
> didn't control things with vast numbers of armed police and 
> soldiers. That was more like an optical illusion or a 
> magician's trick. Of course they had armed police and weren't 
> shy about using them when there was some kind of 
> "counter-revolutionary" trouble in the city square or at the 
> university.
> 
> But most of what kept everybody well-behaved were the 
> Snitches. Every apartment building had one or two. Every 
> block. Every office, every factory, every school.
> 
> If jazz or rock n roll or short-wave radio from the West was 
> leaking out of your apartment, a snitch reported it. They 
> sniffed through your mail for foreign mail and anything 
> slightly suspicious. And of course they eavesdropped on all 
> your casual conversations, and reported any sentiments which 
> weren't in full harmony with the Party Program.
> 
> In return, the Snitches got priority for the material cream 
> the economically stretched, stressed and strained country had 
> to pass around: The best schools for your kids, reserved for 
> the Party Faithful. More liberal travelling. A better car, a 
> bigger apartment.
> 
> And, of course, like Crime Stoppers, straight cash on the 
> barrelhood for Juicy Tips, no questions asked, plenty more 
> where that came from.
> 
> If you can't envision life without some minimal guaranteed 
> volume of privacy for thought, imagination, musical taste, 
> political expression, welcome to your Kafka nightmare. For 
> the most idealistic and Utopian of reasons, the state just 
> stripped you totally naked of any and all right to expression 
> or privacy or individuality or daydreaming. Klaus or Senta 
> two doors down the hall would drop a dime on you. Your 
> neighbors knew the local Crime Stoppers number.
> 
> With civic-minded ever-vigilant neighbors like that, who 
> needs lots of cops?
> 
> Well, all good things must come to an end, and around 1990 
> all these regimes just collapsed like a house of cards. It is 
> not true that these regimes fell without a single shot being 
> fired. Not a single shot was fired by the protesters. The 
> regimes, on the other hand, didn't like the short-term future 
> they were seeing, and shot lots of people to try to stay in 
> power. In those last weeks, mere prison wasn't good enough.
> 
> It is important to realize that, after 45 or 75 years of 
> Government By Bully, Gun, Jail and Snitch (I don't know if 
> the Greeks had a word for that one), eventually bullies, 
> guns, jails and snitches weren't enough to keep most people 
> well-behaved, or locked within borders, or under control, or 
> ignorant, or obedient.
> 
> The government made it quite clear: If you challenge us, we 
> will shoot you.
> 
> It wasn't enough. They're all gone now.
> 
> These are rare historical moments of close inspection for big 
> snitch machines like Crime Stoppers. Ordinarily, while the 
> snitch machine is running on all twelve cylinders, nobody 
> gets to peek inside the machine, to see its paperwork and 
> memos and directives and mugshots and lists of snitches and 
> who they snitched on and over what and when, and what 
> happened to those who got snitched on.
> 
> But after the Velvet Revolutions, you bet the New Guys wanted 
> to look inside those file cabinets that the Ministry of 
> Snitches had been filling with paper for forty years. And 
> they kept great records, because they knew (incorrectly) that 
> no one would ever get to see them.
> 
> Such sadness. Such misery. Such a terrible mirror to hold up 
> to ourselves as a race and a community. Such a terrible 
> reflection, if not of ourselves, of our aunts, our cousins, 
> or co-workers, the postal person, the waitress, other people 
> in the park.
> 
> Most people soon discovered how simple and profitable it was 
> to use the snitch machine to settle old grudges and spites.
> 
> Another guy beat you out in high school for Annika's 
> affections? Make up the right story, send him to jail for 
> three months, get him completely bounced to the bottom of the 
> labor and economic food chain for the rest of his life -- and 
> get $50 to boot!
> 
> Pissed off at that shapely little young tramp upstairs? 
> Couldn't get satisfaction from the guy who repaired your car 
> so badly? Did that teacher insult your kid?
> 
> And the always-popular grudge against your ex-spouse. A 
> built-in state-designed way to suddenly get the upper hand in 
> those lingering disputes.
> 
> Drop a dime to Crime Stoppers.
> 
> People were just settling old scores by the tens of thousands.
> 
> Maybe, in the few countries that have a snitch machine AND a 
> freedom of
> information law, some journalist might get Real Lucky and get 
> a substantive look (with a lot of redactions, you betchum) at 
> the nuts and bolts and dirty laundry and moldy old clam dip 
> of Crime Stoppers.
> 
> Who's using it to settle a score with Roger around the 
> corner? Who's getting bumped up a chair in the civic 
> orchestra since Rita got into all that trouble over pot?
> 
> We're not going to like what we see in the Crime Stoppers 
> files in Winnipeg or Pittsburgh. But that's how all this shit 
> works. Most psychiatrically healthy people don't give a rat's 
> buttock who's smoking or snorting what. But there are always 
> amongst us the Marginal, the Bitter, the Small, the Venal, 
> the Cowardly.
> 
> And you can run a government with lots of them, for decades. 
> Eastern Europe has just shown us the most ghastly face of that.
> 
> Elmer
> 
> ==============
> 
> >-----Original Message-----
> >From:  <>
> >To: Tim Meehan <>;  
> <>;
> > <>; 
> ><>;  
> <>;
> > <>; 
> ><>;  <>
> >Date: Tuesday, December 16, 2003 12:43 PM
> >Subject: Re: MAP: January is Snitch Month
> 
> Please turn in Anne McCellan for harm done to the people of Canada.
> >
> >-----Original Message-----
> >From: Tim Meehan <>
> >Sent: Dec 16, 2003 10:40 AM
> >To: , , 
> ,
> >, , ,
> >
> >Subject: MAP: January is Snitch Month
> >
> >http://www.torontopolice.on.ca/newsreleases/release.php?id=4823
> >
> >Toronto Police Service
> >
> >NEWS RELEASE
> >40 College Street,
> >Toronto, Ontario
> >M5G 2J3
> >
> >Unit/Telephone
> >Corporate Communications
> >416-808-7100
> >
> >We are dedicated to delivering police services, in 
> partnership with our
> >community,to keep the City of Toronto the best and safest 
> place to be.
> >
> >Visit our Web site at http://www.TorontoPolice.on.ca/
> >
> >For Broadcast: 01:27 pm Date: 2003-12-15
> >
> >JANUARY IS CRIME STOPPERS MONTH
> >
> >
> 
> --------------------------------------------------------------
> -------------
> Attachment: http://www.mapinc.org/temp/part8127.html
> 

------------------------------

End of MAPTalk-Digest V03 #282
******************************

Mark Greer ()         ___ ___     _ _  _ _
Media Awareness Project              /' _ ` _ `\ /'_`)('_`\
P. O. Box 651                        | ( ) ( ) |( (_| || (_) )
Porterville, CA 93258                (_) (_) (_) \__,_)| ,__/
(800) 266-5759                                         | |
URL: http://www.mapinc.org/lists/                      (_)

HomeBulletin BoardChat RoomsDrug LinksDrug NewsFeedback
Guest BookMailing ListsMedia EmailMedia LinksLettersSearch